Sentence-level paraphrasing

Word-level paraphrasing is just one strategy. A good paraphrase combines a variety of strategies. Replacing words with synonyms or antonyms is not enough. Look at the following example of an unacceptable paraphrase that relies on word-level paraphrasing alone:

                   ORIGINAL:

Because of their unique perspective, Americans fear globalization less than  anyone else, and as a consequence they think about it less than anyone else. When Americans do think about globalization, they think of the global economy      as an enlarged version of the American economy (Thurow, 1993).  

                   PLAGIARISM: This paraphrase still constitutes plagiarism. WHY? Click for explanation.

Because of their particular outlook, Americans do not dread and are less uneasy about globaliszation compared to people from other countries. As a result, they are less concerned about it than anyone else. Indeed, Americans see globalization as a bigger form of thir own economy (Thurow, 1993).      

 

Sentence-level paraphrasing

Sentence-level paraphrasing is concerned with constructing a new sentence to express the meaning contained in the original text. It may involve one or more of the following:

  • changing the clause order (for example, by changing active constructions to passive);
  • varying sentence openings;
  • changing the sentence type (for example, by combining sentences or breaking up longer sentences)

A combination of word- and sentence-level paraphrasing techniques will have produced a more acceptable paraphrase. Click for an explanation.

Thurow (1993) maintains that because Americans see globalization simply as a bigger form of their own economy, they are less concerned about it than is the rest of the world.

OR write two sentences:

Thurow (1993) maintains that Americans view globalization simply as a bigger form of their own economy. Therefore, they tend to be less concerned about it than is the rest of the world.